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    // Podcast

    Market value of change: 5 principles of successful cloud-enabled transformation

    August 12, 2021 | 16 minutes

    Organizations migrate to the cloud for countless reasons. But moving to the cloud just to move to the cloud shouldn’t be one of them.

     

     

    Overview

    In this episode of IT Availability Now, Leon Godwin, Principal Cloud Evangelist at Sungard Availability Services (Sungard AS) discusses what businesses should consider before embarking on a cloud journey and shares the principles that will guide you to a successful cloud-enabled transformation. Listen to the full episode to learn:

    • Why certain companies are more prepared to shift to the cloud than others
    • The common agents of change that influence your cloud journey and how to approach them to optimise your transformation
    • How to address the growing skills gap that prevents businesses from flourishing in the cloud
    • The elements that make up the “market value of change,” and why you can’t maximise the potential benefits of the cloud without them

    Brian Fawcett is a Senior Manager of Global Sales Engagement at Sungard AS. With over 15 years of experience in a range of industries, he specialises in forming enterprise-wide global talent and learning development programs. Brian has enriched corporate learning culture by matching organisational vision and core values to curricula, leading to application and impact.

    Leon Godwin is the Principal Cloud Evangelist at Sungard AS. As a cloud evangelist, Leon balances the duties of a product marketer with being one of Sungard AS’s direct links to customers. Building a critical mass of support for cloud technologies through thought leadership, enthusiasm and many years of experience, Leon aids customers with complex challenges and helps them adopt creative, robust and efficient cloud solutions.

    Transcript

    BRIAN FAWCETT (BF): Organisations shouldn't move to the cloud just to move to the cloud. They should do it for the business value the cloud offers, but that's not always the case.

    I'm your host Brian Fawcett and this is IT Availability Now, the show that tells storeys of business resilience from the people who keep the digital world available.  

    Businesses move to the cloud for any number of reasons, yet oftentimes that endeavour isn't as fruitful as it could be.

    On this episode of IT Availability Now, Leon Godwin, Principal Cloud Evangelist at Sungard AS, walks us through what you need to consider as you undertake your cloud journey and the principles that will guide you to a successful cloud-enabled transformation.

    Hey, Leon. Good to have you back on the show.

    LEON GODWIN (LG): Hi Brian, excited to be here.

    (BF): The COVID-19 pandemic was a catalyst for cloud adoption and really an accelerant for overall digital transformation. So why were some organisations more equipped to move to the cloud versus others?

    (LG): It all comes down to an organisation's ability to adapt and adapt to those agents of change. When it comes to adapting to change, organisations that have more than one pathway can then choose the pathway that will deliver them the best business outcome.

    It's about the ageless law of businesses being the survival of the fittest, it's not about the strongest. And so, organisations that have that ability to be able to adopt those agents of change are those ones that are going to survive.

    (BF): What are some common agents of change that businesses should be thinking about and really be prepared for?

    (LG): So we're living one right now with the pandemic. We've seen the pandemic have quite a large impact on organisations since they’re suddenly trying to adapt to a new operating model with potentially lots of staff working from home where they potentially have to externalise a lot of services to enable that workforce to be productive from remote locations.

    We also see change in the forms of increasing customers’ demands. Customers are demanding a greater experience when they engage with organisations, and they're becoming more picky with which organisations they choose to engage with.

    There can be financial factors that can be agents of change, like switching from CAPEX to OPEX. There can be changes in terms of the competitive landscape and thse forces that exist in those landscapes can create change for your business, as well as things like mergers and acquisitions.

    And finally, there’s change from things like unplanned events such as disasters or cyber events that can disrupt your business and impact a business's reputation. Any of these at any time can happen, and organisations need to have the ability to effectively respond to them.

    (BF): So, how does an organisation's ability to adapt to these various agents of change affect their cloud journey? What else do they need to consider to optimise their transformation?

    (LG): Adaptation needs to be reinforced with skills and experience. Skills, and indeed the lack thereof, is an area within the cloud that's often overlooked. In fact, there's a recent Gartner report that asked organisations about their skills and the feedback that came back was that they recognise that their legacy skill sets were not the skills they needed to succeed within the cloud. So, I would say that is probably one of the largest elements that organisations need to consider. It's a combination of both skills and experience.

    (BF): And what areas are businesses most struggling to manage in their cloud computing environment?

    (LG): So, touching on another report by 451 Research, if we look at the top three skills gaps that were identified by organisations, expertise on a cloud platform is number one. Cloud-native engineering capability was number two and security expertise was number three. And if you actually expand on that, that kind of makes sense because understanding the capabilities of a platform is key to be able to know what the odds are possible is to change. And then the engineering capability and expertise are what enable that change to take place. And then all of that has to be done within the context of security.

    We can see now that the security threat is greater than it's ever been. And at Sungard, we recognise and we handle a number of disaster-based events, and over the years we've seen the cyber threat increase up the ranking order, so now it's the fourth most common cause of business disruption. So having a secure cloud is obviously critical. There is a shortage of supply of this kind of expertise, which is resulting in an increase in the salaries of demands for these workloads.

    (BF): So, the 451 Research identifies those skill gaps. How do businesses remedy skill gaps?

    (LG): So, 451 went on to go and ask organisations and the responses were kind of interesting because it needs to be put in a little bit of context. The number one answer was training existing staff, and whilst that is absolutely the right answer, it needs to be put into a bit of context. If you go and adopt the cloud journey and you send a member of your staff out to become certified on a given platform, that will give you a level of skills, but it doesn't give you any experience. In an isolated environment within the confines of a training room, you're not getting that knowledge and experiences that are built up over years.

    So, when customers undertake cloud adoption and cloud transformation journeys, when they do it just with their in-house staff that don't have the experience but may have the certification, they don’t necessarily achieve the outcomes they are looking for. This could be by not identifying the risks involved, this could be about not being able to effectively mitigate those risks when they happen and that can result in overruns, which can lead to additional costs.

    The second most common cause or response strategy for addressing the skills gap identified in the report was utilising third-party organisations like managed service providers, contractors, consultants, and the like. And this makes logical sense because knowledge will tell you what the problem is, skills will help you overcome the problem, and experience will give you the best outcomes.

    And it's actually combining these two, that needs to be done. You wouldn't want to risk the crown jewels of your organisation with staff that has no experience, which is why it makes sense to bring in third parties, but as they build up that experience, having existing in-house staff absolutely makes sense. So has to be put in context about when you utilise the skills, and when you pair it with experience.

    (BF): That makes a lot of sense. So, we've covered change and skills. What are some other areas businesses can't afford to overlook on their cloud journey?

    (LG): So, three of the pillars that I like to think of when it comes to cloud will fall under the umbrella of the market value of change. And so, ask yourself three questions. Will it be faster? Will it be cheaper? And will it be better? Now when you're going for adopting a cloud journey, you want to consider, for example, will adopting this enable me to transact faster or deliver my goods to customers faster. Would it allow me to reduce my costs? Would it allow me to displace a competitor and give me a larger market share? These are more the sort of holistic questions you should be asking yourself about cloud rather than the more basic, “I'm just going to move my workloads to the cloud.”

    (BF): That’s interesting, so let's dive into these concepts in greater detail if we can. Talk a little bit about the “cheaper” element first.

    (LG): Okay, so if we were to ask ourselves, “is moving to the cloud going to be cheaper?” If you just mean we do this in isolation, chances are the answer is actually going to be no. If you are just taking your existing platforms and your existing servers and moving them to the cloud, you're not really delivering much in the way of change.

    You're just doing a lift and shift and if you were to price out the costs of the people, processes, and technology of a CAPEX based on-premise deployment, and compare that with an OPEX-based equivalent service within the cloud, chances are the CAPEX over the term would actually work out cheaper. However, this is where organisations fail to understand the true potential of the cloud.

    There are so many services that go extend beyond the cloud. So, cheaper, if we take an example, we looked at the workload. It was a database workload or warehouse workload that did the ETL extract, transform and load function and was based on a SQL platform and that it worked out on an infrastructure service for like £550 a month. That same workload was able to be achieved with platform as a service at 32% of the cost. And indeed, there were other opportunities to drive to make even further savings from that. So, it's about not just utilising the cloud as an infrastructure platform, it's about leveraging its other capabilities to optimise your costs, and that's where you'll see additional savings and things become cheaper.

    (BF): Do you have another good example of this in practise?

    (LG): Sure, so you could adopt a web server. A web server is about delivering web content, but actually who owns that server is largely irrelevant to its ability to deliver that web content. It's actually much more cost-effective to deliver and to provide that web content delivered by a web service, as opposed to a web server. And generally speaking, it's cheaper.

    Likewise, with email, there is an email server versus an email service. We've actually seen recently in the news that there has been a cyber vulnerability with exchange servers that affected on premise servers, and organisations have a lot of time and expense to go and redress that vulnerability, which was a significant vulnerability.

    Whereas platforms such as Office 365 experienced no such interruptions to their service because they delivered it as part of a managed service, so they weren't incurring those additional costs. So, in many ways, a mail service is cheaper than a mail server.

    (BF): Got it. Makes sense. So, let's switch to “faster.” Won’t moving to the cloud automatically allow organisations to speed up certain processes?

    (LG): Much like cheaper, faster is an objective measurement that you can measure. You can measure speed by giving units. And so sometimes just the sheer fact of taking a legacy infrastructure that ran on equipment that's maybe five years old and moving it to newer equipment can help speed up those systems. However, that isn't the real ability of the cloud to deliver things faster. You want to be able to transact faster.

    An example would be in our team recently, we looked at some of our business processes, and we do assessments of customers that require an amount of manual work to provide the output reports to customers. We looked at that, we automated that, and we are now able to take something that took five hours and deliver it in 15 minutes. And so, that enables us to deliver those reports to our customers faster, so we can transact faster.

    Also, the cloud comes with a whole host of tools and capabilities that allow you to develop and deliver and orchestrate cloud environments, much more rapidly than they would in traditional environments so customers can deliver change and develop applications much faster, within the cloud than they would say with on-premises resources.

    Equally, if you wanted to scale out capacity to meet demand, you can do that much more rapidly with the cloud because you have the availability of resources readily available, as opposed to a traditional on-premise where you would have to go through a procurement lifecycle to go and secure the resources that you need, and then maybe when that demand has evaporated you would be left with a legacy debt. So, that reinforces the previous point about making it cheaper because you avoid that legacy debt.

    (BF): So lastly, “providing a better experience.” How do companies measure this as they migrate over to the cloud?

    (LG): Sure. So, this one is actually one of the harder ones to actually give an answer to because the previous ones were quite objective measurements, whereas better is a subjective measurement. So, the first question you want to ask is better for whom? If cloud is done correctly, it can be an enabler to provide a better customer experience.

    If we take the example of Netflix. Netflix combined your usage of the platform, so they identify your account. They use machine learning and analytics to deliver you an individualised customer experience through content recommendations. So, when customers come and engage with a service or platform that is delivering a superior experience, the customer is more likely to stay engaged with that platform, or application, or service, which obviously drives revenue over the longer term.

    You can also use a better experience. I'm sure we've all experienced this in the pandemic when we've done our online grocery shopping. We've either gone to the online grocer and found that their website is unavailable because it's killed overdue to load, or indeed it's just delivering a very slow experience because you can't meet the demands because it's based on a legacy infrastructure that has a finite amount of capacity, where with the cloud near infinite capacity. You tend not to see those same traits and behaviours in a platform such as Netflix. And so it's all about focusing on delivering a better experience, whether that be through delivering superior performance through capacity, availability or disaster recovery features, or indeed changing the way that you actually engage with customers.

    We can take the example of Domino’s Pizza. Traditionally, or historically I should say, they were an organisation where you pick up the phone, you’d order from half a dozen to a dozen different sort of standard pizzas from the menu, they’d make it and take it out to you. But now the experience is better where you can order it on your phone, on your tablet, on your TV, through your Xbox, or through Siri or Alexa. You can GPS track your pizza all the way to your front door. That engages the user and delivers a better customer experience, and now 20% of pizzas sold in the world are sold by Domino's Pizza. That's because they deliver that better and superior customer experience.

    And likewise, when I talked about the transformation processes we use, productivity tools like Microsoft 365 to go and do that. Those are tools that enable us to transact faster.

    (BF): That's great. Migrating to the cloud without a clear and defined plan will prevent companies from realising its full value. To maximise the potential benefits of cloud, you need change and the skills to allow your business to do things better, faster and cheaper.

     Leon, thanks for walking us through the principles of a successful cloud-enabled transformation.

    (LG): Thanks, Brian. Appreciate you having me.

    (BF): Leon Godwin is Principal Cloud Evangelist at Sungard AS. You can find the show notes for this episode at SungardAS.com/ITAvailabilityNow.

    Please subscribe to the show on your podcast platform of choice to get new episodes as soon as they're available.

    IT Availability Now is a production of Sungard Availability Services.

    I'm your host Brian Fawcett. Until next time, stay available.

    In this episode of IT Availability Now, Leon Godwin, Principal Cloud Evangelist at Sungard Availability Services (Sungard AS) discusses what businesses should consider before embarking on a cloud journey and shares the principles that will guide you to a successful cloud-enabled transformation. Listen to the full episode to learn:

    • Why certain companies are more prepared to shift to the cloud than others
    • The common agents of change that influence your cloud journey and how to approach them to optimise your transformation
    • How to address the growing skills gap that prevents businesses from flourishing in the cloud
    • The elements that make up the “market value of change,” and why you can’t maximise the potential benefits of the cloud without them

    Brian Fawcett is a Senior Manager of Global Sales Engagement at Sungard AS. With over 15 years of experience in a range of industries, he specialises in forming enterprise-wide global talent and learning development programs. Brian has enriched corporate learning culture by matching organisational vision and core values to curricula, leading to application and impact.

    Leon Godwin is the Principal Cloud Evangelist at Sungard AS. As a cloud evangelist, Leon balances the duties of a product marketer with being one of Sungard AS’s direct links to customers. Building a critical mass of support for cloud technologies through thought leadership, enthusiasm and many years of experience, Leon aids customers with complex challenges and helps them adopt creative, robust and efficient cloud solutions.

    BRIAN FAWCETT (BF): Organisations shouldn't move to the cloud just to move to the cloud. They should do it for the business value the cloud offers, but that's not always the case.

    I'm your host Brian Fawcett and this is IT Availability Now, the show that tells storeys of business resilience from the people who keep the digital world available.  

    Businesses move to the cloud for any number of reasons, yet oftentimes that endeavour isn't as fruitful as it could be.

    On this episode of IT Availability Now, Leon Godwin, Principal Cloud Evangelist at Sungard AS, walks us through what you need to consider as you undertake your cloud journey and the principles that will guide you to a successful cloud-enabled transformation.

    Hey, Leon. Good to have you back on the show.

    LEON GODWIN (LG): Hi Brian, excited to be here.

    (BF): The COVID-19 pandemic was a catalyst for cloud adoption and really an accelerant for overall digital transformation. So why were some organisations more equipped to move to the cloud versus others?

    (LG): It all comes down to an organisation's ability to adapt and adapt to those agents of change. When it comes to adapting to change, organisations that have more than one pathway can then choose the pathway that will deliver them the best business outcome.

    It's about the ageless law of businesses being the survival of the fittest, it's not about the strongest. And so, organisations that have that ability to be able to adopt those agents of change are those ones that are going to survive.

    (BF): What are some common agents of change that businesses should be thinking about and really be prepared for?

    (LG): So we're living one right now with the pandemic. We've seen the pandemic have quite a large impact on organisations since they’re suddenly trying to adapt to a new operating model with potentially lots of staff working from home where they potentially have to externalise a lot of services to enable that workforce to be productive from remote locations.

    We also see change in the forms of increasing customers’ demands. Customers are demanding a greater experience when they engage with organisations, and they're becoming more picky with which organisations they choose to engage with.

    There can be financial factors that can be agents of change, like switching from CAPEX to OPEX. There can be changes in terms of the competitive landscape and thse forces that exist in those landscapes can create change for your business, as well as things like mergers and acquisitions.

    And finally, there’s change from things like unplanned events such as disasters or cyber events that can disrupt your business and impact a business's reputation. Any of these at any time can happen, and organisations need to have the ability to effectively respond to them.

    (BF): So, how does an organisation's ability to adapt to these various agents of change affect their cloud journey? What else do they need to consider to optimise their transformation?

    (LG): Adaptation needs to be reinforced with skills and experience. Skills, and indeed the lack thereof, is an area within the cloud that's often overlooked. In fact, there's a recent Gartner report that asked organisations about their skills and the feedback that came back was that they recognise that their legacy skill sets were not the skills they needed to succeed within the cloud. So, I would say that is probably one of the largest elements that organisations need to consider. It's a combination of both skills and experience.

    (BF): And what areas are businesses most struggling to manage in their cloud computing environment?

    (LG): So, touching on another report by 451 Research, if we look at the top three skills gaps that were identified by organisations, expertise on a cloud platform is number one. Cloud-native engineering capability was number two and security expertise was number three. And if you actually expand on that, that kind of makes sense because understanding the capabilities of a platform is key to be able to know what the odds are possible is to change. And then the engineering capability and expertise are what enable that change to take place. And then all of that has to be done within the context of security.

    We can see now that the security threat is greater than it's ever been. And at Sungard, we recognise and we handle a number of disaster-based events, and over the years we've seen the cyber threat increase up the ranking order, so now it's the fourth most common cause of business disruption. So having a secure cloud is obviously critical. There is a shortage of supply of this kind of expertise, which is resulting in an increase in the salaries of demands for these workloads.

    (BF): So, the 451 Research identifies those skill gaps. How do businesses remedy skill gaps?

    (LG): So, 451 went on to go and ask organisations and the responses were kind of interesting because it needs to be put in a little bit of context. The number one answer was training existing staff, and whilst that is absolutely the right answer, it needs to be put into a bit of context. If you go and adopt the cloud journey and you send a member of your staff out to become certified on a given platform, that will give you a level of skills, but it doesn't give you any experience. In an isolated environment within the confines of a training room, you're not getting that knowledge and experiences that are built up over years.

    So, when customers undertake cloud adoption and cloud transformation journeys, when they do it just with their in-house staff that don't have the experience but may have the certification, they don’t necessarily achieve the outcomes they are looking for. This could be by not identifying the risks involved, this could be about not being able to effectively mitigate those risks when they happen and that can result in overruns, which can lead to additional costs.

    The second most common cause or response strategy for addressing the skills gap identified in the report was utilising third-party organisations like managed service providers, contractors, consultants, and the like. And this makes logical sense because knowledge will tell you what the problem is, skills will help you overcome the problem, and experience will give you the best outcomes.

    And it's actually combining these two, that needs to be done. You wouldn't want to risk the crown jewels of your organisation with staff that has no experience, which is why it makes sense to bring in third parties, but as they build up that experience, having existing in-house staff absolutely makes sense. So has to be put in context about when you utilise the skills, and when you pair it with experience.

    (BF): That makes a lot of sense. So, we've covered change and skills. What are some other areas businesses can't afford to overlook on their cloud journey?

    (LG): So, three of the pillars that I like to think of when it comes to cloud will fall under the umbrella of the market value of change. And so, ask yourself three questions. Will it be faster? Will it be cheaper? And will it be better? Now when you're going for adopting a cloud journey, you want to consider, for example, will adopting this enable me to transact faster or deliver my goods to customers faster. Would it allow me to reduce my costs? Would it allow me to displace a competitor and give me a larger market share? These are more the sort of holistic questions you should be asking yourself about cloud rather than the more basic, “I'm just going to move my workloads to the cloud.”

    (BF): That’s interesting, so let's dive into these concepts in greater detail if we can. Talk a little bit about the “cheaper” element first.

    (LG): Okay, so if we were to ask ourselves, “is moving to the cloud going to be cheaper?” If you just mean we do this in isolation, chances are the answer is actually going to be no. If you are just taking your existing platforms and your existing servers and moving them to the cloud, you're not really delivering much in the way of change.

    You're just doing a lift and shift and if you were to price out the costs of the people, processes, and technology of a CAPEX based on-premise deployment, and compare that with an OPEX-based equivalent service within the cloud, chances are the CAPEX over the term would actually work out cheaper. However, this is where organisations fail to understand the true potential of the cloud.

    There are so many services that go extend beyond the cloud. So, cheaper, if we take an example, we looked at the workload. It was a database workload or warehouse workload that did the ETL extract, transform and load function and was based on a SQL platform and that it worked out on an infrastructure service for like £550 a month. That same workload was able to be achieved with platform as a service at 32% of the cost. And indeed, there were other opportunities to drive to make even further savings from that. So, it's about not just utilising the cloud as an infrastructure platform, it's about leveraging its other capabilities to optimise your costs, and that's where you'll see additional savings and things become cheaper.

    (BF): Do you have another good example of this in practise?

    (LG): Sure, so you could adopt a web server. A web server is about delivering web content, but actually who owns that server is largely irrelevant to its ability to deliver that web content. It's actually much more cost-effective to deliver and to provide that web content delivered by a web service, as opposed to a web server. And generally speaking, it's cheaper.

    Likewise, with email, there is an email server versus an email service. We've actually seen recently in the news that there has been a cyber vulnerability with exchange servers that affected on premise servers, and organisations have a lot of time and expense to go and redress that vulnerability, which was a significant vulnerability.

    Whereas platforms such as Office 365 experienced no such interruptions to their service because they delivered it as part of a managed service, so they weren't incurring those additional costs. So, in many ways, a mail service is cheaper than a mail server.

    (BF): Got it. Makes sense. So, let's switch to “faster.” Won’t moving to the cloud automatically allow organisations to speed up certain processes?

    (LG): Much like cheaper, faster is an objective measurement that you can measure. You can measure speed by giving units. And so sometimes just the sheer fact of taking a legacy infrastructure that ran on equipment that's maybe five years old and moving it to newer equipment can help speed up those systems. However, that isn't the real ability of the cloud to deliver things faster. You want to be able to transact faster.

    An example would be in our team recently, we looked at some of our business processes, and we do assessments of customers that require an amount of manual work to provide the output reports to customers. We looked at that, we automated that, and we are now able to take something that took five hours and deliver it in 15 minutes. And so, that enables us to deliver those reports to our customers faster, so we can transact faster.

    Also, the cloud comes with a whole host of tools and capabilities that allow you to develop and deliver and orchestrate cloud environments, much more rapidly than they would in traditional environments so customers can deliver change and develop applications much faster, within the cloud than they would say with on-premises resources.

    Equally, if you wanted to scale out capacity to meet demand, you can do that much more rapidly with the cloud because you have the availability of resources readily available, as opposed to a traditional on-premise where you would have to go through a procurement lifecycle to go and secure the resources that you need, and then maybe when that demand has evaporated you would be left with a legacy debt. So, that reinforces the previous point about making it cheaper because you avoid that legacy debt.

    (BF): So lastly, “providing a better experience.” How do companies measure this as they migrate over to the cloud?

    (LG): Sure. So, this one is actually one of the harder ones to actually give an answer to because the previous ones were quite objective measurements, whereas better is a subjective measurement. So, the first question you want to ask is better for whom? If cloud is done correctly, it can be an enabler to provide a better customer experience.

    If we take the example of Netflix. Netflix combined your usage of the platform, so they identify your account. They use machine learning and analytics to deliver you an individualised customer experience through content recommendations. So, when customers come and engage with a service or platform that is delivering a superior experience, the customer is more likely to stay engaged with that platform, or application, or service, which obviously drives revenue over the longer term.

    You can also use a better experience. I'm sure we've all experienced this in the pandemic when we've done our online grocery shopping. We've either gone to the online grocer and found that their website is unavailable because it's killed overdue to load, or indeed it's just delivering a very slow experience because you can't meet the demands because it's based on a legacy infrastructure that has a finite amount of capacity, where with the cloud near infinite capacity. You tend not to see those same traits and behaviours in a platform such as Netflix. And so it's all about focusing on delivering a better experience, whether that be through delivering superior performance through capacity, availability or disaster recovery features, or indeed changing the way that you actually engage with customers.

    We can take the example of Domino’s Pizza. Traditionally, or historically I should say, they were an organisation where you pick up the phone, you’d order from half a dozen to a dozen different sort of standard pizzas from the menu, they’d make it and take it out to you. But now the experience is better where you can order it on your phone, on your tablet, on your TV, through your Xbox, or through Siri or Alexa. You can GPS track your pizza all the way to your front door. That engages the user and delivers a better customer experience, and now 20% of pizzas sold in the world are sold by Domino's Pizza. That's because they deliver that better and superior customer experience.

    And likewise, when I talked about the transformation processes we use, productivity tools like Microsoft 365 to go and do that. Those are tools that enable us to transact faster.

    (BF): That's great. Migrating to the cloud without a clear and defined plan will prevent companies from realising its full value. To maximise the potential benefits of cloud, you need change and the skills to allow your business to do things better, faster and cheaper.

     Leon, thanks for walking us through the principles of a successful cloud-enabled transformation.

    (LG): Thanks, Brian. Appreciate you having me.

    (BF): Leon Godwin is Principal Cloud Evangelist at Sungard AS. You can find the show notes for this episode at SungardAS.com/ITAvailabilityNow.

    Please subscribe to the show on your podcast platform of choice to get new episodes as soon as they're available.

    IT Availability Now is a production of Sungard Availability Services.

    I'm your host Brian Fawcett. Until next time, stay available.

    If you have any questions, we're ready to help.

    Get in touch with a Sungard AS sales specialist.

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